Category Archives: Weekly Bible Lesson Ideas

Ideas for studying the Bible Lesson “Substance” – SEPTEMBER 11, 2016

Dear Readers,

For this week’s blog, we are sharing a clip from one of our podcasts onBeatitudes mentioned throughout this week’s Bible Lesson on “Substance” —

Matthew 5:8

Blessed are the pure in heart: for they shall see God.

SH 341:8

Jesus said, “Blessed are the pure in heart: for they shall see God” [Truth].

 

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Sincerely, 

Biblos Foundation

Ideas for studying the Bible Lesson “Christ Jesus” – AUGUST 28, 2016

Dear Readers,

For this week’s blog, we are sharing a clip from one of our eCourses: “Gospel of John – Part 1” (week 3, recording 4),  which references a line in Section 1 in this week’s Bible Lesson on “Christ Jesus.”  

John 6: 35, 38

35  And Jesus said unto them, I am the bread of life: he that cometh to me shall never hunger; and he that believeth on me shall never thirst.

38  For I came down from heaven, not to do mine own will, but the will of him that sent me.

 

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Sincerely, 

Biblos Foundation

Ideas for studying the Bible Lesson “Soul” – AUGUST 14, 2016

Dear Readers,

For this week’s blog, we are sharing a clip from one of our newer eCourses: “Job’s Trial and Restoration,” which references Job 23:13 found in Section 1 in this week’s Bible Lesson on “Soul” — 

Job 23:13-14

13  But he is in one mind, and who can turn him? and what his soul desireth, even that he doeth.

14  For he performeth the thing that is appointed for me: and many such things are with him.

 

If you are a PrimePlus Subscriber, access the full “Job” eCourse here.

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Sincerely, 

Biblos Foundation

Ideas for studying the Bible Lesson “Spirit” – AUGUST 7, 2016

Dear Readers,

For this week’s blog, we are sharing a clip from one of our talks: “In the beginning…Genesis 1,” which references Genesis 1:26-27 found in Section 1 in this week’s Bible Lesson on “Spirit”.

 

Genesis, Chapter 1, 26-27

26  And God said, Let us make man in our image, after our likeness: and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over the cattle, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth.

27  So God created man in his own image, in the image of God created he him; male and female created he them.


Sincerely, 

Biblos Foundation

Ideas for studying the Bible Lesson “Truth” – JULY 24, 2016

Dear Readers,

For this week’s blog, we are sharing a Video Vignette on Bethlehem from our Members section. This Nativity story is in this week’s Bible Lesson, Section Two:

Matthew 2: 1,2

1  Now when Jesus was born in Bethlehem of Judæa in the days of Herod the king, behold, there came wise men from the east to Jerusalem,

2  Saying, Where is he that is born King of the Jews? for we have seen his star in the east, and are come to worship him.

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Sincerely, 

Biblos Foundation

Ideas for studying the Bible Lesson “God” – JULY 3, 2016

Dear Readers,

We will discuss two citations from this week’s lesson on “God.”

God


RESPONSIVE READING

Jeremiah 29:11

I know the thoughts that I think toward you, saith the Lord, thoughts of peace, and not of evil, to give you an expected end.”

Ellicott’s Commentary for English Readers

To give you an expected end.—Better, to give you a future (that which is to be hereafter) and a hope. This is the literal rendering of the words, and it is far more expressive than that of the English version.  The “future” tells them that their history as a people is not yet over; the “hope” that there is a better time in store for them. To wait for that future, instead of trusting in delusive assurances of immediate release, was the true wisdom of the exiles.” (biblehub.com)

Pulpit Commentary

For I knew the thoughts, etc.; i.e. though seventy years must pass over you in exile, yet do not apprehend that I have forgotten you, for I know full well what my purpose is towards you – a purpose of restoring to you “peace” and prosperity. An expected end; rather, a future and a hope; i.e. a hopeful future (comp. Jeremiah 31:17,  ‘There is a hope for thy future’). That unexpectant apathy which is the terrible accompaniment of so much worldly sorrow was not to be an ingredient in the lot of the Jews.” (biblehub.com)


SECTION 3

Psalms 27:8

“When thou saidst, Seek ye my face; my heart said unto thee, thy face, Lord, will I seek.”

 “The passage is designed to denote the state of the mind, or the disposition, in regard to the commands of God. The command or precept was to seek God. The prompt purpose of the mind or heart of the Psalmist was, that he would do it. He ‘immediately’ complied with that command, as it was a principle of his life – one of the steady promptings of his heart – that he would do this. The heart asked no excuse; pleaded for no delay; desired no reason for not complying with the command, but at once assented to the propriety of the law, and resolved to obey. This related undoubtedly at first to prayer, but the ‘principle’ is applicable to all the commands of God. It is the prompting of a pious heart immediately and always to obey the voice of God, no matter what His command is, and no matter what sacrifice may be required in obeying it.” (Barnes’ Notes on the Bible)

Face in Hebrew can mean “presence” (Thayer’s Greek Lexicon).  To see one’s face is to be in one’s presence.  And biblically speaking, God’s presence is represented by the Tabernacle.  And in the Tabernacle, specifically the Most Holy Place or Holy of Holies.

God has invited us to “Seek His face.”  Isn’t that God doing the calling?  And what is our response? “Thy face, Lord, will I seek.”  We have acknowledged the invitation and answered, “Yes, God, we will come into Thy presence.  The fact is, we’re already there, spiritually speaking, aren’t we?  We’ve never really been absent from the Lord.

God’s presence is, in our Mary Baker Eddy’s  words, “broader than the solar system and higher than the atmosphere of our planet” (Mis. 174:6).  He is the center and circumference of our being.  There is no place to go where we could be out of His presence and care. 


BIBLOS RESOURCE:

Here is a short audio clip from our eCourse: “Church in the Wilderness” 

 

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Sincerely, 

Biblos Foundation

Ideas for studying the Bible Lesson “Is the Universe, Including Man, Evolved by Atomic Force?” – JUNE 19, 2016

Dear Readers,

The Disciple John

This week’s blog will discuss John 1:1, plus verses 3-5, which are in this week’s Lesson: 

John 1:1

1  In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.

Here is a short audio clip from our eCourse: “The Gospel of John – Part 1” 

 

If you are a PrimePlus Subscriber, click here to listen to the entire clip!

 


Sincerely, 

Biblos Foundation

Ideas for studying the Bible Lesson “GOD THE PRESERVER OF MAN” – JUNE 12, 2016

Dear Readers,

What spiritual lesson can we learn from the story of David and Goliath?

David-and-Goliath

The blog this week will discuss David’s battle with Goliath, from Section Two in this week’s Bible Lesson:

I Samuel 17:4, 8, 10, 11, 32, 38, 39, 40, 45, 46, 47, 50

4  And there went out a champion out of the camp of the Philistines, named Goliath, of Gath, whose height was six cubits and a span.


QUESTIONS:

Who were the Philistines?  Why were they a threat to the Israelites?

What does the word “champion” mean in Hebrew?

Where does the encounter take place?

Why would this be the most detailed of all the stories about David?

What would give David, a shepherd boy, the courage to go fight a “giant”?  What is the role of a shepherd?

Why would David refuse to wear Saul’s armor?  What qualities does David express which enable him to face Goliath without fear?

Why didn’t others in King Saul’s army have the willingness to face Goliath?  What immobilized the army?


DIGGING DEEPER DISCUSSION:

DAVID:

David, second ruler of Israel, was destined to become Israel’s greatest king. He was associated with the period of the United Kingdom. David, the youngest of the eight sons of Jesse, of the tribe of Judah, was a shepherd boy caring for his father’s sheep in the hills of Bethlehem when the prophet Samuel came, at God’s bidding, to anoint him Israel’s future king: and ‘the Spirit of the Lord came upon David from that day forward.’. . . According to one account (I Sam, 16:14-23) David was already known to King Saul as an accomplished harpist and as a man of war when the king sent for him to serve at his court that his troubled mind might be soothed with music. According to another record (I Sam. 17:1-18:2) David was unknown to Saul until he appeared as a shepherd youth before the king’s army as it stood in battle array against the army of the Philistines. For forty days their champion, a nine-foot giant name Goliath, had paraded himself morning and evening, boastfully defying Israel’s army. Fearlessly David took up the challenge, declaring, ‘Thou comest to me with a sword . . . but I come to thee in the name of the Lord of hosts, the God of the armies of Israel, whom thou hast defied.’ Using only the weapon he had proved, a shepherd’s slingshot, he killed the Philistine giant with a single stone” (Berenice Shotwell’s Getting Better Acquainted with Your Bible, page 112).

David explains the true purpose of the contest:  so that “all the earth may know there is a God in Israel, and that all this assembly may know that the Lord does not save by sword and spear; for the battle is the Lord’s and He will give you into our hand.

David calls Israel away from its imitation of the nations, and calls the nations away from their foolish defiance of Yahweh.” (Brueggemann, First and Second Samuel, Interpretation, 132).

GOLIATH:

Goliath. The Philistine champion who was slain in combat by David in the Valley of Elah. Goliath is included among the descendants of the giants, who, probably as foreign mercenaries serving with the Philistines, took up their residence in Gath. His enormous stature and herculean armor struck terror into the army of Saul during the forty days he defiantly challenged it to provide a champion for a trial by combat, whose outcome would determine the fate of the war” (Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Vol. 2, page 439).

I defy the armies of Israel; give me a man, that we may fight together—In cases of single combat, a warrior used to go out in front of his party, and advancing towards the opposite ranks, challenge someone to fight with him. If his formidable appearance, or great reputation for physical strength and heroism, deterred any from accepting the challenge, he used to parade himself within hearing of the enemy’s lines, specify in a loud boastful, bravado style defying them, and pouring out torrents of abuse and insolence to provoke their resentment” (Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Bible Commentary).

MEASUREMENTS:

“It is difficult to translate the Hebrew weights and measures accurately into modern figures, and the estimates of scholars vary. The cubit was the distance from the elbow to the tip of the middle finger. The span was the distance from the tip of the thumb to the tip of the little finger when the fingers are spread, and was the approximate equivalent of half a cubit. Naturally these measurements varied according to the height of the people who used them. The Israelites were a comparatively small people, and the most probable estimate for the cubit in use in Palestine is about 17.5 inches. This puts the height of the Philistine giant at about 9 ½ feet, which may seem like an exaggeration, but it appears from II Sam. 21:15-22 that the Philistines had a number of men of unusual height in their service” (Interpreter’s Bible Vol. 2, page 972).


LENS OF CHRISTIAN SCIENCE:

S&H 268:11

“In this revolutionary period, like the shepherd-boy with his sling, woman goes forth to battle with Goliath.”

ARTICLE

Imaginary Goliaths,” Irving C. Tomlinson, The Christian Science Journal, Vol. 31, No. 2, May 1913.


BIBLOS RESOURCES:

Click here to watch to a FREE video on “David and Goliath: In the Valley of Elah” in our Prime section! It is the most detailed story of David in the Bible.

Or, paste this link in your internet browser:

http://biblosfoundation.org/biblos-prime/prime/ez-on-demands/david-and-goliath-in-the-valley-of-elah


RECOMMENDED FOR BIBLE STUDY:

Bible History: Old Testament by Alfred Edersheim

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Sincerely, 

Biblos Foundation

Ideas for studying the Bible Lesson “GOD THE ONLY CAUSE AND CREATOR” – JUNE 5, 2016

Dear Readers,

Why is it important to pray, “Lead us not into temptation”?

Sermon on the Mount

Jesus giving the Sermon on the Mount

The blog this week will discuss the verse in the Lord’s Prayer on leading us not into temptation, from the Responsive Reading in this week’s Bible Lesson (note: we bolded the words that we dig into further):

Matthew 6:13

“And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil: . . . .”


QUESTIONS:

Does God actually tempt humanity?  If not, why pray “Lead us not into temptation”?  What does this petition mean?

How does this prayer reconcile with James’ statement in 1:13 – “Let no man say when he is tempted, I am tempted of God: for God cannot be tempted with evil, neither tempteth he any man:”

Is it a “sin” to be tempted?  In Hebrews 4, verse 15 – the author tells us: “For we have not an high priest which cannot be touched with the feeling of our infirmities; but was in all points tempted like as we are, yet without sin.”  What does this verse mean in relation to Jesus’ statement in the Lord’s Prayer?

Would God “test” us to prove our faith in Him?


DIGGING DEEPER DISCUSSION:

Temptation = peirasmos in Greek:  “trial, testing” (Strong’s Lexicon)

Deliver:

Deliver = “rhouamai” in Greek:  “rescue, deliver from danger or destruction” (Strong’s Lexicon)

Deliver = Rhýomai (from eryō, “draw to oneself“) – properly, draw (pull) to oneself; to rescue (“snatch up”); to draw or rescue a person to and for the deliverer (HELPS Word-studies)

In Mt 6:13 (“the Lord’s Prayer”), (rhýomai) is used in the closing sentence, Deliver (rhýomai) us from evil” – i.e. Deliver me to Yourself and for Yourself.” That is, “Lord deliver me out of my (personal) pains and bring me to You and for You.”

“(rhýomai) properly means, ‘to snatch out for oneself'” (H. Cremer, G. Winer)

“Properly,  (rhýomai) means to draw out. . . to one’s self – i.e. to rescue for oneself (to oneself).  rhýomai (“rescue”) implies removing someone in the midst (presence) of danger or oppression, i.e. delivered ‘right out of’ and to (for) the rescuer.” (Thayer’s Lexicon)

Evil:

Evil poneros in Greek: “the evil one” (Thayer’s Lexicon)

Evil, grievous =

“From a derivative of ponos; hurtful, i.e. Evil (properly, in effect or influence, and thus differing from kakos, which refers rather to essential character, as well as from sapros, which indicates degeneracy from original virtue); figuratively, calamitous; also (passively) ill, i.e. Diseased; but especially (morally) culpable, i.e. Derelict, vicious, facinorous; neuter (singular) mischief, malice, or (plural) guilt; masculine (singular) the devil, or (plural) sinners — bad, evil, grievous, harm, lewd, malicious, wicked(-ness).”  (Strong’s Exhaustive Concordance)

New Testament Connections:

I Cor. 10:13

There hath no temptation taken you but such as is common to man: but God is faithful, who will not suffer you to be tempted above that ye are able; but will with the temptation also make a way to escape, that ye may be able to bear it.


LENS OF CHRISTIAN SCIENCE:

Mis. 114:21

“Christian Scientists cannot watch too sedulously, or bar their doors too closely, or pray to God too fervently, for deliverance from the claims of evil. Thus doing, Scientists will silence evil suggestions, uncover their methods, and stop their hidden influence upon the lives of mortals. Rest assured that God in His wisdom will test all mankind on all questions; and then, if found faithful, He will deliver us from temptation and show us the powerlessness of evil, — even its utter nothingness.”

Mis. 115:15

“Your means of protection and defense from sin are, constant watchfulness and prayer that you enter not into temptation and are delivered from every claim of evil, till you intelligently know and demonstrate, in Science, that evil has neither prestige, power, nor existence, since God, good, is All-in-all.”

Letter

In her letter to James Neal, of 1897, Mary Baker Eddy spoke of this stanza of the Lord’s Prayer [Matt. 6:13] and told him:

“Pray daily, never miss praying, no matter how often: ‘Lead me not into temptation,’ – scientifically rendered, – Lead me not to lose sight of strict purity, clean pure thoughts; let all my thoughts and aims be high, unselfish, charitable, meek, – spiritually minded. With this altitude of thought your mind is losing materiality and gaining spirituality and this is the state of mind that heals the sick” (quoted in Robert Peel’s Mary Baker Eddy: Years of Authority, page 101.) 


BIBLOS RESOURCES:

Listen to a FREE clip from our eCourse “Sermon on the Mount” —

 

If you are a PrimePlus Subscriber, click here to listen to the entire eCourse! 


RECOMMENDED FOR BIBLE STUDY:

The Gospel according to Matthew (The Pillar New Testament Commentary (PNTC))

Click the below book cover to view the PDF version online — then click on the “Look inside“ button:

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RECOMMENDED FOR BIBLE STUDY


Sincerely, 

Biblos Foundation

Ideas for studying the Bible Lesson “ANCIENT AND MODERN NECROMANCY, alias MESMERISM AND HYPNOTISM, DENOUNCED” – MAY 29, 2016

Dear Readers,

Why is it so important to do as James tells us to do – “resist the devil”?

image001The blog this week will discuss the statement in James 4:7, from the Responsive Reading in this week’s Bible Lesson (note: we bolded the words that we dig into further):

James 4:7

Submit yourselves therefore to God.  Resist the devil, and he will flee from you.


QUESTIONS:

What does “denounced” mean?

Why is resistance so important in our healing work?  What are we to resist?

How do we submit to God?


DIGGING DEEPER DISCUSSION:

GREEK VOCABULARY:

“Submit” = “hypotasso” in Greek: “to obey, to place or rank under, to subject.” (Strong’s)

“Resist” = “anthistemi” in Greek: “take a stand against, oppose, hold one’s ground – refuse to be moved” (Strong’s and HELPS Word-studies).”  It was a military term in classical Greek and meant “take a firm stand against.”

“Devil” = “diabolos” in Greek: “the Slanderer, false accuser, backbiter.” (Strong’s and HELPS word-studies)

“The Devil can fight, but he cannot conquer; if, therefore thou dost withstand him, he will flee from thee, beaten and ashamed” (The Shepherd of Hermas – an Apocryphal work)

Resist the devil, and he will flee from you – While you yield to God in all things, you are to yield to the devil in none. You are to resist and oppose him in whatever way he may approach you, whether by allurements, by flattering promises, by the fascinations of the world, by temptation, or by threats. See I Peter 5:9. Satan makes his way, and secures his triumphs, rather by art, cunning, deception, and threatenings, than by true courage; and when opposed manfully, he flees. The true way of meeting him is by direct resistance, rather than by argument; by steadfastly refusing to yield in the slightest degree, rather than by a belief that we can either convince him that he is wrong, or can return to virtue when we have gone a certain length in complying with his demands. No one is safe who yields in the least to the suggestions of the tempter; there is no one who is not safe if he does not yield.” (Barnes’ Notes)


LENS OF CHRISTIAN SCIENCE:

Mary Baker Eddy wrote to Edward Kimball (after he had written to her that he must leave Boston due to illness): 

“Stay in Boston and vicinity always if you please. I know you can master it, the lie, there as well as elsewhere.  To run before a lie is to accept its terms.  This works like running before the enemy in battle.  You will be followed, pursued til you face about, trust in God and stand on Spirit, denying and facing and fighting all claims of matter and mortal mind, both one.” (Quoted in Gilbert Carpenter’s papers)


BIBLOS RESOURCES:

Listen to a FREE clip from our Audio Talk in Prime: “The Whole Armor of God – Vol. 1: “To Think and Act Rightly”

 

If you are a Prime Subscriber, click here to listen to the entire talk!


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Sincerely, 

Biblos Foundation